Simple Brazil Nut Milk

Simple Brazil Nut Milk

Simple Brazil Nut Milk

Gluten free/Dairy free/Cholesterol free/Low in sugar/Low in saturated fat/Vegan/Paleo/Raw

Brazil nuts are the best source of selenium in the world. Just one single kernel provides 100% of the daily recommendation! Due to the rich source of this mineral, these nutritious nuts are very beneficial for thyroid function. They have also been shown to fight inflammation, combat cancer, positively affect mood and improve heart health. However, the amount of Brazil nuts consumed should be in small amounts since they are so rich in selenium and this can cause a selenium toxicity. Pay special attention if making brazil nut milk and use sparingly to add to coffee, tea, smoothies, etc. and not as a staple food.

This basic recipe is perfect as a starting point to adapt to your tastes and needs.

Yield: 1 quart (4 cups / 946 mL)

  • 1 cup Brazil nuts (135 g)
  • 1 quart water (946 mL)

Directions:

  1. Place Brazil nuts in the NutraMilk container.
  2. Press Butter cycle, set for 1 minute.
  3. Press Start.
  4. Open the container lid, add water. Replace lid.
  5. Press Mix (do not change the default Mix time).
  6. Press Start.
  7. Press Dispense.
  8. Press Start and open spigot to fill your storage container.

From 200 DELICIOUS & HEALTHY RECIPES for your NutraMilk from Nuts, Seeds, Grains & More by Rita Rivera


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